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Reno, NV- You think you know it’s coming. The anticipation builds with every passing thump. The beat is speeding up as it approaches its peak; that moment when space and time cease to exist. That perfect break between the verse and the drop when everything stops. You grab your friend’s shoulders, ready to go into hardcore shuffle mode as soon as the song kicks back in. But then, nothing. A boring transition back to the top of another song.  <br><br/> This was the case during a satellite party on a recent Saturday night in Reno, the biggest little city in the world. Four amateur DJ’s were booked to each play for an hour. Along with the crowd satisfaction, these finger spinners had another reason to have the set of the night. They were all competing for a coveted spot at Dirtybird Campout 2022.   <br><br/> Dirtybird is known for discovering breakout artists. Their commitment to bringing in new talent to mesh with the veterans is one of the reasons the festival has so much magic. While every musician has their own style, curating a festival lineup that feels unique is always a challenge. DBC goes beyond your typical EDM and finds DJ’s that are putting a new spin on music.  <br><br/> As a three-time attendee of the festival, DJ Saline Dion was stoked when she found out she made the cut to play at the Reno warehouse party.   <br><br/> “My friends and I love Dirtybird and they would freaking flip their wads if I got to do a set there. I knew I had to go all in and do something completely different if I was going to stand out,” Dion stated.   <br><br/> And stand out she did. The other DJ’s on the lineup included Reno favorite Dustin Day, San Diego-based Statutory Vape, and No Farm No Fowl, a new producer out of Arkansas.  These performers brought the heat to the dance floor. There wasn’t a still body in the venue as they played a variation of house, breaks, techno, funk, heavy bass, and even some disco.   <br><br/> Closing the night, Saline Dion began to get nervous. She loved her track selections, but felt they were too similar to everything else that had already been played. That’s when her lightbulb moment happened.  <br><br/> “If everyone else has these huge buildups and bigger drops, I’ll do the exact opposite. Music has no rules and I’m going to play a set that will make everyone’s knees hit the floor.”  <br><br/> That’s precisely what occurred. Two minutes into her first song, the beat began to grow. Faster, steadier, everyone knows what’s about to happen. Only…it didn’t. Dion left the drums going for an additional three minutes, sparking an outcry of emotion from the crowd. Partiers were noticeably irritated as they tried their best to break out of the overpowering 808’s. One man, dressed as a giant koi fish, screamed out.  <br><br/>  “WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO US? WE HAVEN”T DONE ANYTHING WRONG!” He was later seen weeping in the corner for a prolonged period of time.   <br><br/> As Dion transitioned from one track to the next, the audience grew weary of her collection of 90’s pop and mid-2000’s shit rock. If you thought N’Sync couldn’t slide directly into Powerman 5000, you were right. The attendees grew agitated. Halfway through the set, they collectively sat down in a circle and joined hands, praying to a higher power for it to stop.   <br><br/> “It was actually really beautiful,” said Jennifer Martinez, a longtime Dirtybirder. “Not the set, that was cringe times 100, but the way we all banded together as a unit. I’ll never forget the energy flowing through that circle as we begged her to stop playing.”  <br><br/> At the end of the night, it was Dustin Day who took home the prize of playing at Campout, but most people agreed, the Saline Dion set was what they will remember most.   <br><br/> “It’s essentially how trauma victims come together to help each other heal,” regaled a man who only goes by Bunk. “That was torture, but we endured, and we are all stronger for it.”  <br><br/> Dion claims she is proud of trying to push a boundary, even if it didn’t succeed. “You’ve gotta stand out. You’ve got to take chances.”  <br><br/> That’s an inspirational message any of us can get behind. Now drop that beat.   <br><br/>

Reno, NV- You think you know it’s coming. The anticipation builds with every passing thump. The beat is speeding up as it approaches its peak; that moment when space and time cease to exist. That perfect break between the verse and the drop when everything stops. You grab your friend’s shoulders, ready to go into hardcore shuffle mode as soon as the song kicks back in. But then, nothing. A boring transition back to the top of another song.  <br><br/> This was the case during a satellite party on a recent Saturday night in Reno, the biggest little city in the world. Four amateur DJ’s were booked to each play for an hour. Along with the crowd satisfaction, these finger spinners had another reason to have the set of the night. They were all competing for a coveted spot at Dirtybird Campout 2022.   <br><br/> Dirtybird is known for discovering breakout artists. Their commitment to bringing in new talent to mesh with the veterans is one of the reasons the festival has so much magic. While every musician has their own style, curating a festival lineup that feels unique is always a challenge. DBC goes beyond your typical EDM and finds DJ’s that are putting a new spin on music.  <br><br/> As a three-time attendee of the festival, DJ Saline Dion was stoked when she found out she made the cut to play at the Reno warehouse party.   <br><br/> “My friends and I love Dirtybird and they would freaking flip their wads if I got to do a set there. I knew I had to go all in and do something completely different if I was going to stand out,” Dion stated.   <br><br/> And stand out she did. The other DJ’s on the lineup included Reno favorite Dustin Day, San Diego-based Statutory Vape, and No Farm No Fowl, a new producer out of Arkansas.  These performers brought the heat to the dance floor. There wasn’t a still body in the venue as they played a variation of house, breaks, techno, funk, heavy bass, and even some disco.   <br><br/> Closing the night, Saline Dion began to get nervous. She loved her track selections, but felt they were too similar to everything else that had already been played. That’s when her lightbulb moment happened.  <br><br/> “If everyone else has these huge buildups and bigger drops, I’ll do the exact opposite. Music has no rules and I’m going to play a set that will make everyone’s knees hit the floor.”  <br><br/> That’s precisely what occurred. Two minutes into her first song, the beat began to grow. Faster, steadier, everyone knows what’s about to happen. Only…it didn’t. Dion left the drums going for an additional three minutes, sparking an outcry of emotion from the crowd. Partiers were noticeably irritated as they tried their best to break out of the overpowering 808’s. One man, dressed as a giant koi fish, screamed out.  <br><br/>  “WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO US? WE HAVEN”T DONE ANYTHING WRONG!” He was later seen weeping in the corner for a prolonged period of time.   <br><br/> As Dion transitioned from one track to the next, the audience grew weary of her collection of 90’s pop and mid-2000’s shit rock. If you thought N’Sync couldn’t slide directly into Powerman 5000, you were right. The attendees grew agitated. Halfway through the set, they collectively sat down in a circle and joined hands, praying to a higher power for it to stop.   <br><br/> “It was actually really beautiful,” said Jennifer Martinez, a longtime Dirtybirder. “Not the set, that was cringe times 100, but the way we all banded together as a unit. I’ll never forget the energy flowing through that circle as we begged her to stop playing.”  <br><br/> At the end of the night, it was Dustin Day who took home the prize of playing at Campout, but most people agreed, the Saline Dion set was what they will remember most.   <br><br/> “It’s essentially how trauma victims come together to help each other heal,” regaled a man who only goes by Bunk. “That was torture, but we endured, and we are all stronger for it.”  <br><br/> Dion claims she is proud of trying to push a boundary, even if it didn’t succeed. “You’ve gotta stand out. You’ve got to take chances.”  <br><br/> That’s an inspirational message any of us can get behind. Now drop that beat.   <br><br/>

Nottingham went on to say, “My friends begged me to live in the moment. Just be yourself, have fun, and don’t worry about capturing their phone numbers. If it’s meant to be, you’ll find each other. But I couldn’t live with that. These were the coolest people I’d ever met in my life and I need to know that I can find them back in the real world. But looking at my phone now, I’m more confused than ever.”  <br><br/> Modesto, California- What began as a vacation weekend at a music festival has left one camper horrified. Miranda Nottingjam, a resident of Bakersfield, attended her first Dirtybird Campout with two other long-time friends. The three besties assumed they would be inseparable throughout the fest, gathering enough memories to fill social media for months.  <br><br/> “We knew we would be there for each other,” said Nottingjam. “We coordinated costumes, compared schedules. We even made sure we are all on the same color squad. Go Green! What we didn’t realize was that every single person we met would feel like they were an extension of not only our friend group, but our family.”  <br><br/> Miranda woke up on Saturday to a terrifying discovery. Between gallivanting across multiple stages, attending the Drag Queen show at Claude’s Cabin, and building a totem at Craftopia; she had already entered 178 numbers into her phone. The names attached were clues about who they were but the whole night was already a blur of laughter, smiles, and wobbly legs.  <br><br/> Pink Crown Butt Pasties? Unicorn Onesie Jen? Captain Blastoff? Miranda had a vague recollection of meeting these festival fairies, but how would she ever track down who they were? At a festival like Dirtybird, campers are known to transform themselves on the daily, adorning new costumes and personas that seemingly have nothing to do with who they were before.  <br><br/> By the end of the three-day event, Miranda (who for reasons she can’t remember now prefers to be called “Mermanda") had amassed over 700 new contacts, none of which had real names or locations. She said there was even one person who pierced her soul to the point where she had a vision of them getting married and having children. But who was it? Sparkly Robe Jim? The Real Pajama Shaman? Or could it be the contact simply labeled, “Fuuuuuckkkkkkkk?” <br><br/> Mermanda claims she will get to the bottom of this by messaging every single contact, even if it takes months.  <br><br/> “When beautiful and amazing people enter your life, even for a brief moment, you can’t let them slip away. Whoever you are, Fuuuuuckkkkkkkk, I will find you and we will grab a poke bowl, if you’re the person who told me we would do that.”